Discipline Nodes

Youth Leadership Institute Facilitator Fellowship

Annenberg Institute for School Reform (AISR) welcomes applicants who believe in the power of youth voice and leadership in the work to promote equity in their schools and communities.

About YLI
The Youth Leader Institute (YLI) is a convening of youth leaders, adult allies, and educators from across New England whose shared vision of education equity is grounded in a model that places students at the center of their own learning.
AISR has led the design and implementation of the annual Youth Leadership Institute (YLI) for all Nellie Mae Education Foundation youth organization and district grantees. Since 2013, NMEF grantees have sent teams of youth leaders and adult allies to the YLI to learn more about each other’s work and diversity, youth-led social change, and student-centered learning. In 2014, the YLI planning process integrated a Youth Planning Team made up of high school students from all over New England. The Youth Planning Team, facilitated by AISR, helps determine the design and content of each year’s YLI.

Please see visit the website or attached for more information.

Invitation to Participate in AERA mini-course: Ethical Issues in Collaborative Research

Greetings,
We are inviting participants for our AERA mini-course: Ethical Issues in Collaborative Research. 
All professional development courses are listed on the AERA meeting page (click here[aera.net] for a list). We’ve recently learned, however, that professional development courses and mini-courses are not searchable in the AERA program. Below is the course description and instructions for how to register. 
Thank you,
Ron, Sheeva, and Natalie

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Open Letter to Philadelphia School Reform Commission Highlights Concern over School Privatization

In an open letter to the School Reform Commission (SRC) of the School District of Philadelphia, several Philadelphia-area faculty members raise concerns over the plans to privatize three elementary schools.  The letter questions the process by which the SRC decided on privatization, as it excluded parents and communities who prefer neighborhood schools, and the rationale that poor student performance drives privatization.

Reflections on the Second National URBAN Conference

On Friday, November 13th and Saturday, November 14th, over fifty scholars and activists from the Urban Research-Based Action Network (URBAN) gathered for their second national conference at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Gilda Ochoa, Professor of Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies and Sociology at Pomona College, reflects on the conference: Learning from the Contradictions: A Critical Reflection on Collaborative Action-Research.

URBAN Gathers for Second National Meeting at University of Massachusetts, Boston

On Friday, November 13th and Saturday, November 14th, over fifty scholars and activists from the Urban Research-Based Action Network (URBAN) gathered for their second national conference at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. This gathering was sponsored by the Spencer and W.T. Grant Foundations.

Mark R. Warren, associate professor in thGroup shot 2e Department of Public Policy and Public Affairs at the McCormack Graduate School and national co-chair for URBAN, organized the conference along with Lindsay Morgia, a PhD student in the Public Policy department, and members of the URBAN conference planning team. Planning team members include John Diamond at University of Wisconsin, Tim Eatman of Syracuse University, Ron Glass of UC Santa Cruz, Michelle Fine of the CUNY Graduate Center, and Celina Su of the CUNY Graduate Center. Continue reading

Planning Accreditation Board New Standards Would Eliminate Diversity Measures

Dear URBAN network,

As I’m sure some of you know, the Planning Accreditation Board (which accredits planning schools) is revising their standards, including the elimination of particular metrics around student and faculty diversity. This will be devastating to efforts to recruit and retain students and faculty of color in planning schools.

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URBAN Member Open Letter in Solidarity with the Students at the University of Missouri

This past weekend, scholars and activists from around the country gathered for the second national URBAN convening, at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. (We will be reporting more on this meeting as soon as possible, in an upcoming newsletter.) One of the outcomes of this meeting is an urgent open letter, as members of URBAN, in solidarity with the student protestors at the University of Missouri.

Faculty voices are important in informing popular media coverage of the student protests– especially as the mainstream storyline quickly shifts from the students’ important demands for racial and social justice to individualizing debates around free speech and political correctness. Shifting the blame to protesters rather than the institution ignores the generations of exclusion of African Americans, Latinxs and other marginalized groups from the University of Missouri. Continue reading

Guidelines for New URBAN Nodes

Starting an Urban Research Based Action Network (URBAN) node gives you the opportunity to bring academics and community leaders together locally and be part of a national network where you can learn, share resources, and work together on the basis of common values. URBAN is building a new and exciting field of collaborative research committed to equity and social justice and you will have the opportunity to support and influence its development.

In advance of submitting an application, prospective nodes will learn about the work of URBAN and its existing nodes. Prospective node leaders work closely with local university and community stakeholders to determine if there is an interest in creating a node, what local challenges there are, and how node members might benefit from a joint research partnership.

Please see the full guidelines and application process.

Professor Dana Wright’s New Book: “Active Learning: Social Justice Education and Participatory Action Research”

Active Learning: Social Justice Education and Participatory Action Research

Dana Wright (Routledge)

This new book was published in Routledge’s Teaching/Learning Social Justice series. It is endorsed on the back cover by Mark Warren and Pedro Noguera and includes a forward by Lee Anne Bell.

Here is the table of contents and link to purchase the book: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781138821712[routledge.com]

Active Learning examines a participatory action research (PAR) project led by young people as a teaching and learning approach with implications for pedagogy, schools, educational policy and education reform and transformation. Continue reading