Philadelphia

URBAN Philadelphia – community conversation about public education in our city

The recent election and subsequent cabinet level nominations, especially in education, are cause for alarm on many levels. As members of URBAN Philadelphia, we want to provide the space for educators, parents, and concerned residents to engage in conversation about how we can collectively address the challenges that are in store for public education in our city. Please see information on this event below. We hope to see you there. Continue reading

URBAN Gathers for Third National Meeting: “Critical Solidarities and Multi-Scalar Powers”

Urban Research-Based Action Network (URBAN) Gathers for Third National Meeting at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York

On Thursday, March 31st and Friday, April 1st, nearly one hundred scholars, activists, and artists gathered for the third national URBAN conference at the CUNY Graduate Center: Critical Solidarities and Multi-Scalar Powers. Continue reading

Open Letter to Philadelphia School Reform Commission Highlights Concern over School Privatization

In an open letter to the School Reform Commission (SRC) of the School District of Philadelphia, several Philadelphia-area faculty members raise concerns over the plans to privatize three elementary schools.  The letter questions the process by which the SRC decided on privatization, as it excluded parents and communities who prefer neighborhood schools, and the rationale that poor student performance drives privatization.

Reflections on the Second National URBAN Conference

On Friday, November 13th and Saturday, November 14th, over fifty scholars and activists from the Urban Research-Based Action Network (URBAN) gathered for their second national conference at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Gilda Ochoa, Professor of Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies and Sociology at Pomona College, reflects on the conference: Learning from the Contradictions: A Critical Reflection on Collaborative Action-Research.

URBAN Gathers for Second National Meeting at University of Massachusetts, Boston

On Friday, November 13th and Saturday, November 14th, over fifty scholars and activists from the Urban Research-Based Action Network (URBAN) gathered for their second national conference at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. This gathering was sponsored by the Spencer and W.T. Grant Foundations.

Mark R. Warren, associate professor in thGroup shot 2e Department of Public Policy and Public Affairs at the McCormack Graduate School and national co-chair for URBAN, organized the conference along with Lindsay Morgia, a PhD student in the Public Policy department, and members of the URBAN conference planning team. Planning team members include John Diamond at University of Wisconsin, Tim Eatman of Syracuse University, Ron Glass of UC Santa Cruz, Michelle Fine of the CUNY Graduate Center, and Celina Su of the CUNY Graduate Center. Continue reading

Guidelines for New URBAN Nodes

Starting an Urban Research Based Action Network (URBAN) node gives you the opportunity to bring academics and community leaders together locally and be part of a national network where you can learn, share resources, and work together on the basis of common values. URBAN is building a new and exciting field of collaborative research committed to equity and social justice and you will have the opportunity to support and influence its development.

In advance of submitting an application, prospective nodes will learn about the work of URBAN and its existing nodes. Prospective node leaders work closely with local university and community stakeholders to determine if there is an interest in creating a node, what local challenges there are, and how node members might benefit from a joint research partnership.

Please see the full guidelines and application process.

URBAN website survey

As announced in the last newsletter, National URBAN is in the process of moving to CUNY this fall. As part of this transition, we are reaching out to local and disciplinary nodes and members in a number of ways.
One of our first goals is to find out more about how you currently use (or don’t use) the URBAN website, how to make the website more responsive to members’ goals and needs, and how to best facilitate digital space for collaboration across the URBAN network.
We would greatly appreciate your input, which will help us to stay connected to similarly minded scholars and activists through URBAN. We ask that you respond by Monday, November 30th, 2015.

Continue reading

Philadelphia Convening on High Stakes Testing

On Saturday, October 24 a collaborative comprised of Philadelphia parents, teachers, and researchers will host Convening on High Stakes Testing: Envisioning Alternatives & Planning Next Steps.  The event will take place from 9:30am-4:00pm at Temple University in the Kiva Auditorium, Ritter Anex (1301 Cecil B. Moore Avenue).

The event is designed to create partnerships in support of replacing high stakes testing with more meaningful forms of assessment and accountability.  Collaborating organizations include URBAN, Alliance for Philadelphia Public Schools, Caucus of Working Educators, Opt Out PhillyTeacher Action Group, Temple Teacher NetworkUnited Opt Out, and University Community Collaborative .   Continue reading

“State of the Research” on School Closure

A collaboration of local scholars will convene a conference on school closures on June 19 at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA from 8:30am-6:00pm in Stiteler Hall.  Registration is open to the public and is a $15 suggested donation to be collected at the event (nobody will be turned away for lack of funds).  The conference is entitled The “State of the Research” on School Closure: A Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference and will bring together researchers who are working across this range of inquiry in the mid-Atlantic region. The goal of this conference is to share findings and approaches, articulate commonalities and divergences across place, and set an agenda for ongoing research and engagement with this and other issues of urban and educational equity. Continue reading