Resources

New Book by Shawn Ginwright: Hope and Healing in Urban Education

Hope and Healing in Urban Education is the latest work by Shawn Ginwright, Associate Professor of Education in the Africana Studies Department and Senior Research Associate for the Cesar Chavez Institute for Public Policy at San Francisco State University.  The book proposes a new movement of healing justice to repair the damage done by structural violence in urban communities. Drawing on ethnographic case studies from around the country, this book chronicles how teacher activists employ healing strategies in stressed schools and community organizations, and work to reverse negative impacts on academic achievement and civic engagement, supporting their students to become powerful civic actors. Hope and Healing in Urban Education examines how social change can be enacted from within to restore a sense of hope to besieged communities and counteract the effects of poverty, violence, and hopelessness.

Learn more about the book and how to save 20% here!

Updated Guidelines for Peer Reviewing Community Based Research

The URBAN scholar-activist network’s publications committee has drafted guidelines to aid editors and reviewers of sociological journals and conference papers in assessing community- based research submissions. The guidelines are also intended to support community-based researchers who are presenting studies for critical reviews.  Please send your thoughts and questions to charlotte_ryan@uml.edu.

Check out the relevant documents below!

Executive Summary

Full Guidelines

URBAN Sessions at ASA and SSSP

The URBAN scholar-activist network’s publications committee has drafted guidelines to aid editors and reviewers of sociological journals and conference papers in assessing community- based research submissions. The guidelines are also intended to support community-based researchers who are presenting studies for critical reviews. Members of the URBAN publications committee will present these guidelines for discussion at multiple events at the 2015 meeting of the American Sociological Association from August 22-25 as well as at the 2015 meeting of the Society for the Study of Social Problems from August 21-23.  Both conferences will be held in Chicago, IL.  The Chairs of the Boston and Los Angeles URBAN nodes are speakers in several of the sessions at ASA.  Stop by to learn more and get involved with URBAN at the local level!

A full schedule of sessions planned for the ASA annual meeting can be accessed here!

Alvaro Huerta TEDx Talk on Human Migration

Throughout history, human beings, especially the global poor, have been in constant movement. In a talk delivered at a TEDxClaremontColleges event on March 7, 2015 Dr. Alvaro Huerta argues that we should view this migration as a universal human right and treat honest, hard-working immigrants with the dignity and respect that they deserve.

Dr. Alvaro Huerta is an Assistant Professor at Cal Poly Pomona with a joint appointment in Urban & Regional Planning and Ethnic & Women’s Studies. While he earned his B.A. (history) and M.A. (urban planning) from UCLA, he also earned his doctorate (city & regional planning) from UC Berkeley. His work is at the crossroads of community development, economic development, social movements, Chicana/o—Latina/o studies, and more. He is the author of the book Reframing the Latino Immigration Debate: Towards a Humanistic Paradigm. Married to his wife Antonia, Dr. Huerta is the son of Mexican immigrants from the beautiful state of Michoacán.

Ethics Working Group Conference Video

The video below features Ethics Working Group members Ron Glass, Sheeva Sabati, and Joyce King.  It serves as a companion to the graphic visualization that was created during the Ethics working group session at the National URBAN conference held April 30-May 1, 2015.  Learn more about the conference and access the full set of working group graphic visualizations here!

Ethics Working Group Video ImageClick here to play the video!

 

New Book on Social Justice Education and PAR

Active Learning: Social Justice Education and Participatory Action Research examines a participatory action research (PAR) project led by young people as a teaching and learning approach with implications for pedagogy, schools, educational policy and education reform and transformation.  This book was written by Dana E. Wright and published by Routledge in March 2015. Continue reading

Civic Engagement, Civic Development, and Higher Education

How can colleges and universities build capacity for civic engagement and civic development? Previous monographs in the Civic Series have examined various ways of achieving this purpose—strengthening student learning, involving the faculty, and establishing campus-community partnerships. Civic Engagement, Civic Development, and Higher Education, the fourth in the series, focuses on the instrumental role of leadership and highlights the importance of individuals who are integral to the building process. Continue reading

The Formation of a Grassroots Movement

When the city of Los Angeles banned gas-powered leaf blowers in 1996, the law sparked one of the most dynamic grassroots campaigns by Latino immigrants in recent history. Latino immigrant gardeners, working with a small group of Chicana/o activists, organized the Association of Latin American Gardeners of Los Angeles (ALAGLA), which pressured city leaders to reverse the ban. ALAGLA pursued its objectives by engaging in the political process, taking direct action, advocating technological adaptations, and reframing the gardeners and their tools in a positive light. Turning public opinion in their favor, they persuaded city leaders to void the draconian elements of the ordinance, which included a misdemeanor charge, a $1,000 fine, and jail time for gardeners using the blowers. ALAGLA’s movement can be compared in some ways to earlier immigrant-organizing efforts by organized labor, notably the United Farm Workers and the Service Employees International Union’s Justice for Janitors campaign, but it is also distinguished from them by ALAGLA’s nonbureaucratic grassroots structure. The association’s campaign for social and economic justice shows the potential for collective action among marginalized immigrant workers and petty entrepreneurs in the informal economy. Continue reading