Methods

Resources on methods and methodology for conducting community-based research and scholarship.

Updated Guidelines for Peer Reviewing Community Based Research

The URBAN scholar-activist network’s publications committee has drafted guidelines to aid editors and reviewers of sociological journals and conference papers in assessing community- based research submissions. The guidelines are also intended to support community-based researchers who are presenting studies for critical reviews.  Please send your thoughts and questions to charlotte_ryan@uml.edu.

Check out the relevant documents below!

Executive Summary

Full Guidelines

URBAN Sessions at ASA and SSSP

The URBAN scholar-activist network’s publications committee has drafted guidelines to aid editors and reviewers of sociological journals and conference papers in assessing community- based research submissions. The guidelines are also intended to support community-based researchers who are presenting studies for critical reviews. Members of the URBAN publications committee will present these guidelines for discussion at multiple events at the 2015 meeting of the American Sociological Association from August 22-25 as well as at the 2015 meeting of the Society for the Study of Social Problems from August 21-23.  Both conferences will be held in Chicago, IL.  The Chairs of the Boston and Los Angeles URBAN nodes are speakers in several of the sessions at ASA.  Stop by to learn more and get involved with URBAN at the local level!

A full schedule of sessions planned for the ASA annual meeting can be accessed here!

Boston Community Based Data Event

On December 4, 2014 URBAN Boston and the Millennium Ten Initiative hosted an event focused on the use of community-based data for measurable, breakthrough results!  The event was held on from 6-8:30pm at the Black Box Theater at Codman Academy (14 Epping Street in Dorchester, MA).  One of the highlights of this event was a presentation by Youth HUB. Slides of this presentation can be found here.  A full summary of the event can be found here!

Report: Bringing Theory to Practice Seminar

This is a report of the Bringing Theory to Practice Seminar held on May 5, 2014 at UMass Boston.  The purpose of this seminar was to examine and explore a wide range of faculty rewards (including promotion criteria, awards, faculty development support, and policies at various levels) that provide incentives and recognition to faculty for undertaking community-engaged scholarship (CES). Throughout our discussions, we considered community-engaged scholarship as the advancement of knowledge focusing on social issues through mutually beneficial, reciprocal collaboration with peers outside the university who have locally grounded knowledge and experience.

The report is intended to be actively used to engage further discussion and to provide recommendations to the UMass system on how changes to faculty rewards can be developed and how the University’s commitment to CES can be further encouraged.

Access the report here

Guidelines for Peer Reviewing Community Based Research

The URBAN Publications Committee has drafted these guidelines for evaluating community- based research (CBR). In so doing, they hope to help researchers, editors, and reviewers seeking to identify high-quality community-based research to place in their journals. The Committee welcomes your feedback.  Please send your thoughts and questions to charlotte_ryan@uml.edu.

Check out the relevant documents below!

Executive Summary

Full Guidelines

ASA and SSSP Pre-conferences related to the guidelines

Collaborative Research Principles

These collaborative research principles, as refined by members of the URBAN.Boston Node on March 19, 2014, are the output of multiple conversations among collaborative research partners. The initial ideas for these principles were generated from a brainstorming session held with URBAN.Boston and Mattapan United at the ABCD Family Service Center in October 2013. The principles were then distilled into bullet points and reviewed in planning team meetings and online forums. On January 30, 2014 Robert Jenkins (Mattapan United), Soo Hong (Wellesley College), Patricia Kruger-Henney (UMB) and Monica Garlick (UMB) met to further discuss ways to refine these principles.  These changes were then discussed with URBAN.Boston Planning Team members on February 3, 2014. 

Principles of collaborative research include: Continue reading

Masters Thesis: Use of Photovoice in Ecological-Community Psychology

This Ecological-Community Psychology masters thesis utilizes a form of participatory action research called Photovoice wherein participants co-create photos which are physical sites for learning and sharing information.  The thesis aims to understand the varying experiences among survivors of sexual violence on the Michigan State University campus in order to better assess the level of support provided by the campus-community to the diversity of survivors.   Continue reading

Digital Story: Use of Photovoice in Ecological-Community Psychology

This Ecological-Community Psychology masters thesis utilizes a form of participatory action research called Photovoice wherein participants co-create photos which are physical sites for learning and sharing information.  The thesis aims to understand the varying experiences among survivors of sexual violence on the Michigan State University campus in order to better assess the level of support provided by the campus-community to the diversity of survivors.

Participants in the thesis project (survivors of sexual violence) assembled the photos and narratives and created a digital story, a video compilation of their lived realities. This digital story was shown at two different events, planned by the masters student (now doctoral student) who wrote the thesis and the participants. One event was a tightly knit survivor community of other survivors, campus-community activists, allies; the other event was open to the entire Michigan State University community.

Continue reading